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Category: Dogs

Kidney Disease in Dogs: Symptoms & More

Posted 03.11.22 by Alison Bradshaw, DVM

As a pet owner, you want to keep your dog as healthy as you can for as long as possible. Unfortunately, kidney disease is a common condition in dogs—especially older ones. Luckily, it is treatable. Your pet will only have a chance to live a long and happy life if you seek veterinary attention as soon as you notice signs...Read More

Pancreatitis in Dogs: Symptoms & More

Posted 03.11.22 by Alison Bradshaw, DVM

The pancreas is one of your dog’s vital organs. It sits on the right side of the abdomen, right next to their stomach. The pancreas serves an essential role in creating the enzymes your dog needs to digest its food. It also produces insulin and other hormones that regulate your dog’s metabolism and glucose level. If your dog’s pancreas becomes...Read More

Heartworm Prevention Year Round

Posted 10.08.19 by Lee Ann Newman, DVM

Summer has gone and chilly fall mornings are upon us, so we should soon have a reprieve from the heat, humidity and insects that pester us during the warm months. However, this does not mean that they totally go away, or that we can stop treating our pets for heartworms and fleas. Heartworms are spread through mosquito bites. Did you...Read More

Does My Dog Have Cataracts?

Posted 08.06.19 by Reagan Bugg, DVM

Does your senior dog have hazy or blue gray eyes? Have you ever wondered if your dog has cataracts or has trouble seeing? Frequently, my clients ask me if their dog has cataracts , or assume  they have them because of a blue gray haze to the lens of the eye. Today we will talk about differentiating a normal age...Read More

Euthanasia: How to say Goodbye

Posted 07.10.19 by Ellen Barry Buco, DVM

How do you know it’s time? Quality of life assessments are one of the hardest decisions a pet owner faces. Euthanasia offers a peaceful death that alleviates suffering and pain for animals. The hard part is determining if it is time to consider euthanasia. As a general rule when the bad days outnumber the good days it is time to...Read More

Ruptured Cranial Cruciate in Dogs (Torn ACL)

Posted 05.27.19 by Bart E. Madison, DVM

A ruptured cranial cruciate ligament (CCL), also known as a torn ACL, is one of the most common causes of acute and chronic hind limb lameness we see in clinic practice. The CCL in dogs, much like humans, is one of the major ligaments that connect the upper leg bone (the femur) to the lower leg bone (the tibia). Often,...Read More

Can You Handle the Hair?

Posted 05.13.19 by Alison Bradshaw, DVM

Being a pet owner and veterinarian, the struggle is real with pet hair. It somehow makes its way into every imaginable nook and cranny and even somehow drifts into most of my food dishes. We have just grown accustomed to pet hair and cleaning, but clients ask me all the time what they can do to stop pet shedding. If...Read More

Don’t Be Socially Awkward

Posted 03.11.19 by Claudia G. Mangum, DVM

What exactly is socialization and why are we concerned about it? Socialization has been defined as a special learning process where an animal learns to interact with and tolerate members of its own species as well as members of other species. This is the process by which we learn to get along with each other. Lots of research has gone...Read More

The Poison in Your Pantry: Canine Chocolate Toxicity

Posted 02.13.19 by Emme Patterson, DVM

It can be a very scary moment when you stroll into your kitchen find any of these scenarios: Your dog feasting on the thoughtfully laid out bowl of individually wrapped heart-shaped dark chocolate candies that you placed on the counter in honor of Valentine’s Day.  The new tub of cocoa powder that you bought at the grocery store last week...Read More

Let’s Talk About Poop

Posted 01.23.19 by Pamela Chandler, DVM

Pet owners frequently have questions regarding if their pets feces might be abnormal and or when to be concerned. What is considered normal / abnormal feces? If the consistency is where you are unable to pick it up in your hand then it is considered to be loose. Most pet’s feces are either light or dark brown in color. Black or red feces can signify...Read More

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